Show and Tell

Building quadcopters (drones); nursing students’ negativity towards the aging; studying the effects of video gaming on attention and impulsivity—these are just a few of the research projects that were presented at the Undergraduate Research Initiative Showcase. Announcing the winners and next year’s program…

For the past two semesters, 27 student and faculty pairs have been working together on research as part of Pace’s Undergraduate Research Initiative. From gender—Toemageddon and how news media frames gender-variance and gender-neutrality to what motivated women to participate in the recent Arab Spring revolution—to genes—identifying those necessary for the development of the brain and sense of smell of zebrafish to genetic profiling studies to identify novel pathways involved in the reactivation of tuberculosis.

On April 29 in NYC and May 1 in PLV, student and faculty pairs presented their research through poster sessions and formal presentations at the Undergraduate Research Initiative Showcases. The winning pair on the PLV Campus was Biology student Ruchi Sheth and Biology and Health Sciences Professor Jack Horne, PhD, who researched genes necessary for the development of the olfactory system in zebrafish. Honorary mention went to Nursing student Chava Pollak and Nursing Professor Sharon Stahl Wexler, PhD, for their work on the impact of an aging sensitivity experience on nursing students.

“I have acquired many concrete skills over the course of this project including public speaking and time management as I juggled this project with my regular course load. Additionally, I have broken out of the insular world of a student into the world of a working professional. My eyes are wide open and I am staring at a world of opportunity, adventure, and endless possibilities for my career in nursing,” says Pollak. “Most of all, the precious and greatest gift this project has given me is an unparalleled mentor and teacher who has afforded me all these opportunities of learning, networking, and personal growth.”

The winner pair on the NYC Campus was Arts and Entertainment Management and Film and Screen Studies student AliReza Vaziri and Environmental Studies Professor Marley Bauce, who focused on campus-wide environmentalism and understanding Pace’s sustainability initiatives through its dining halls. Honorary mention went to Biochemistry student Sophia Miotto and Biology Professor JaimeLee Rizzo, PhD, for their work on the synthesis of novel compounds to treat neuromuscular disorders.

Vaziri will travel to San Francisco to continue research with Professor Judith Pajo. “I plan on continuing my research into the problems associated with food waste by traveling to San Francisco over the summer to shoot footage for my documentary film. I firmly believe that conducting interdisciplinary research is crucial before taking any initiative,” says Vaziri. “This research project has had a significant impact on my experience at Pace University. I do believe that this research has made me a stronger candidate for the GreenPace Sustainability Award and the Jefferson Community Service Award, both of which I received this year.”

You can read more about the pairings and their progress on their blogs at www.pace.edu/ugresearch.

Attention undergraduate students from all majors: The Pace Undergraduate Research Initiative is back for the 2013-2014 academic year! This means you, yes you, will have the opportunity to be paired up with a faculty member according to interests and background to work on a research project from September 2013 until March 2014. Interested in conducting research with a faculty member and publishing your findings and presenting at a national conference?  Apply by May 30!  For more on the student or faculty application process and requirements, click here.

Interested in something for this summer? You’re in luck! To further increase opportunities for students to undertake research with faculty, the Student-Faculty Research Program has been expanded to include summer participants this year! Apply by Friday, May 31.

All research initiatives will be recognized at end-of-year showcases on both campuses and two award winners (one on each campus) will be announced and receive an award and funding to attend a regional or national conference. In addition to recognition, you’ll gain hands-on experience and a deeper appreciation of your field, work closely with world-renowned faculty, and strengthen your research, critical thinking, analytical, and writing skills.

Show and Tell

Forcing cancer cells to quit; discovering how a Pace student-managed investment portfolio outperformed professionally-managed funds; analyzing online communities for parents with LGBTQ children; and building and studying the potential uses of quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). Student and faculty pairs present their research at the Undergraduate Research Initiative Showcases on April 29 in NYC and May 1 in PLV.

For the past two semesters, 27 student and faculty pairs have been working together on research as part of Pace’s Undergraduate Research Initiative—from researching the brain development and sense of smell of zebrafish to studying the effects of video gaming on impulsive behavior in college students to combating neuromuscular disorders through the synthesis of novel therapeutic drugs to addressing the attitudes of nursing students toward the geriatric population, and much more.

Please join Provost Uday Sukhatme, ScD, and the Division for Student Success in recognizing the achievements of the 2nd Annual Pace Undergraduate Research Program’s student-faculty pairs at the Undergraduate Student Faculty Research Showcases.

NYC Showcase:
Monday, April 29
10:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Student Union
One Pace Plaza

PLV Showcase:
Wednesday, May 1
10:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Kessel Student Center
Gottesman Room

Please RSVP by Monday, April 22 to Sue Maxam, EdD, at (914) 773-3849 or smaxam@pace.edu and note which showcase(s) you plan to attend.

You can read more about the pairings and their progress on their blogs at www.pace.edu/ugresearch.

Interested in applying for a 2013-2014 grant to conduct research? Student and faculty applications are due by Thursday, May 30. For more on the application process and requirements, click here.

In addition to the Undergraduate Research Initiative, the Provost has partnered with the Office of Sponsored Research and the Faculty Research Planning Committee to host the First Annual Pace Wide Research Day being held on Thursday, April 25, from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the Gottesman Room and Butcher Suite on the PLV Campus and on Tuesday, April 30 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the Student Union and the Schimmel Lobby on the NYC Campus.

Last year, Pace faculty submitted 141 proposals for external funding and received 97 external awards. The Pace Research Day will celebrate and recognize both funded and not funded faculty research. All faculty are encouraged to present the results of their current research undertaken by the faculty as well as jointly with their students. For more information, click here.

Earth Month: Food for Thought

To celebrate Earth Month, each week The Pulse will highlight Pace research and programs that are making an impact on the environment. This week, Professor Marley Bauce and student AliReza Vaziri ’13 team up for an undergraduate research project to gauge environmental sustainability in Pace’s Dining Halls. >>Read More

Professor Marley Bauce and senior AliReza Vaziri are prime examples of how professors and students have come together to make a difference. In this case, the duo has undertaken an innovative new research project on environmental sustainability–and how Pace can adopt a leadership role in the movement.

Recycling, purchasing energy saving appliances, and whizzing around in a Prius are stylish ways to show your support for environment sustainability, but they aren’t necessarily making the impact you think they are. According to a 2006 meta-analysis conducted by the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, industrial agriculture releases 33% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Of this 33%, beef production claims half the responsibility. Forget the Prius: It may be time to confront the steak.

So what can Pace do to help minimize environmental damage? Professor Bauce and Vaziri have teamed up in the Division of Student Success’ Undergraduate Student-Faculty Research Initiative to gauge the environmental sustainability measures of Pace’s Dining Halls and identify what Pace can do to improve.

Professor Bauce and Vaziri believe that Pace could implement three primary changes in order to remain on the cusp of environmental sustainability awareness.

“Pace can lead the initiative by offering more ecologically-friendly options for students,” Professor Bauce said.  As of now, the café does offer some vegetarian options. “We have met with representatives of Chartwell’s to discuss our research.”

Another suggestion the research partners have proposed is to implement a “Meatless Monday” campaign across campus, an idea that has already been implemented at the Pace Law School on the White Plains campus. Through this campaign, a wider variety of meat-free food alternatives are offered to students on Mondays, along with educational programs designed to encourage students to eat less meat… both for their health, and for the health of the planet.

NYU and Columbia have also implemented “Meatless Monday” campaigns in order to encourage students to refrain from eating meat on Mondays, thereby reducing their carbon footprints as well as reducing health risk factors.

In a survey that Professor Bauce and Vaziri distributed to 3,000 Pace students and faculty members, the Pace community expressed their desire for an advanced administrative position on environmental consciousness, citing sustainable living as a clear social value.

“The survey asked if [students] would alter their eating habits in order to promote ecological sustainability, and the consensus was that they would not want to change their eating habits out right on their own,” Professor Bauce said. “However, when asked whether they felt that Pace should offer more options for students to eat less meat, the response was overwhelming: The same survey subjects believe that  Pace should launch an initiative to provide students with the option to eat more responsibly if they choose. This is a fascinating dynamic between consumer and corporate environmental responsibilities, right here in the heart of New York City.”

Finally, Vaziri, who founded the campus organization A Dollar’s Difference and was recently awarded Pace’s Jefferson Award for Public Service, suggests that Pace use its influence and power to not only help the environment, but also to help less fortunate individuals within our community. “We would like to see Pace limit food waste, and donate its left over, unused foods to food banks in the area,” Vaziri explained, “We are currently in talks with several to try and set it up.” Americans currently throw away approximately 50% of the food they purchase; this food accumulates in landfills and emits methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. This is but one more way in that what we eat has a profound effect on the local and global environment.

Says Professor Bauce, “Our next steps are to meet with Provost Sukhatme to discuss options; distribute another survey to students; and prepare a document for distribution around the university, which outlines various ways in which the Pace community can use food as an important means of expressing an environmental identity.”

The findings of their research will be presented via a poster panel at the Division of Student Success’ Showcase event on April 29 from 10:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. in the Student Union. Admission to this event is free and open to the public. For more information, please contact Sue Maxam, EdD, at smaxam@pace.edu.

For updates on his developing research, follow AliReza’s blog at here.

Written by Pace student Sarah Aires ’14

A World of Opportunities

Helping victims of sex trafficking in Bangladesh; researching sustainable fishing policies in Norway; studying cybersecurity to help governmental agencies. If you’re interested in scholarships and fellowships both abroad and at home, keep reading.

Thinking about applying for a Fulbright or American Rhodes scholarship? Have your eye on a Gilman or Boren scholarship to study abroad for a semester? Do you want to be one of the 200,000+ people who have volunteered with the Peace Corps? Watson, Goldwater, NSF, Truman? Wondering what these scholarships and fellowships are and how you can get more info?

The final Undergraduate Research Preparation Series of the semester, A World of Opportunities: Prestigious Scholarships and Fellowships, will give you info on all this and more.

  • Learn about national and international scholarships and fellowships that relate to your scholarly interests and find out how to apply.
  • Discover how these opportunities can help enhance job and graduate school applications.

PLV Campus
Monday, April 8, 2013
12:20 p.m.–1:15 p.m.
Kessel C/D
Please RSVP to Allyson King at aking@pace.edu by Friday, April 5.

NYC Campus
Wednesday, April 10, 2013
12:20 p.m.–1:15 p.m.
One Pace Plaza, Room W211
Please RSVP to Jenny Ko at jko2@pace.edu by Monday, April 8.

For more information on the sessions, please contact Sue Maxam, University Director for Student Academic Engagement, at smaxam@pace.edu.

For more information on research at Pace, visit www.pace.edu/ugresearch.

Your ePassport to Success

Put down the fancy paper, walk out of the Staples, and head to a research prep series session on creating your very own ePortfolio to bring your research to life.

Resume, schmesume. We have three words for you: Portable. Professional. Personal. Forget trying to cram in all of your work and research onto a tiny sheet of paper. It’s a digital world and we are digital boys and girls.

An online collection of all your work, ePortfolios showcase your accomplishments, give you the opportunity to creatively represent yourself, your education, your research, and so much more. You can post your resume, files, images, videos, and blogs that show your success and progress as a student while enriching your learning, preparing you for your field of work, and sharpening your technological skills. You can also include extracurricular activities and student organizations you’re a part of, network with others, and people can even post letters of recommendation for you to show prospective employers. The possibilities are endless!

That’s why the next session in the Undergraduate Research Preparation Series is focused on Creating ePortfolios to Showcase Research, where you’ll learn all about ePortfolios, including how to structure yours to best display your work and research process, as well as incorporate it into applications for internships, jobs, and graduate school.

Sessions will be held as follows:

PLV Campus
Monday, March 11:  12:20 p.m.-1:15 p.m.
Electronic Classroom, Mortola Library
RSVP to Allyson King at aking@pace.edu by Friday, March 8.

NYC Campus
Wednesday, March 13:  12:20 p.m.-1:15 p.m.
One Pace Plaza, W200A Computer Lab
RSVP to Jenny Ko at jko2@pace.edu by Monday, March 11.

The final session in the series, A World of Opportunities, which will give students information about prestigious national and international scholarship and fellowship opportunities that relate to the types of research in which they are interested, will be held on April 8 in PLV and April 10 in NYC.

(Re)Searching for Answers

Are you passionate about a specific subject area or topic? Stop by undergraduate research info sessions in NYC and PLV to find out what students and faculty are currently working on, how great it looks on your resume, and how you can get involved!

Tuberculosis. Parasitic diseases. The sense of smell of zebrafish. The effects of video gaming on impulsive behavior in college students. Star Trek and history. Sex differences and romantic rejection. These are just a few of the topics students and faculty members have tackled over the last two years through funding from Pace’s Undergraduate Research Initiative. Whether you’re thinking about applying for an grant to work with a faculty member on a research project and possibly win additional funding to present at a national conference or you just want to learn more about research opportunities at Pace, it’s time for you to hear more about the Undergraduate Research Preparation Series!

Undergraduate research is an excellent way to prepare for graduate school, post-baccalaureate opportunities, and full-time jobs. If you are interested in working closely with a professor on high-level academic research at some point during your college career, you are encouraged to attend the second seminar in the Undergraduate Research Preparation Series on Scholarly Research and Design, where you will learn about different types of research and research design.

PLV Campus
Monday, February 25
12:20 p.m.-1:15 p.m.
Kessel C/D
Please RSVP to Allyson King at aking@pace.edu by February 22.

NYC Campus
Wednesday, February 27
12:20 p.m.-1:15 p.m.
W200A Computer Lab, One Pace Plaza
Please RSVP to Jenny Ko at jko2@pace.edu by February 25.

At this session, you’ll:

  • Learn about the differences between quantitative and qualitative research methods
  • Discover research methodologies used in various disciplines as well as for specific types of research projects
  • Become familiarized with library and online resources for advanced-level researchers

For more information, visit www.pace.edu/ugresearch. Additional sessions will be held on topics including ePortfolios to showcase research and a world of opportunities throughout the semester.

An Experiment Gone Right

Are you passionate about a specific subject area or topic? Stop by undergraduate research info sessions in NYC and PLV to find out what students and faculty are currently working on, how great it looks on your resume, and how you can get involved!

The sense of smell of zebrafish. The effects of video gaming on impulsive behavior in college students. Horror stories and web-based artwork. Star Trek and history. Esterases and heart failure. Literacy and the gender gap. Combating neuromuscular disorders. These are just a few of the topics students and faculty members have tackled over the last two years through funding from Pace’s Undergraduate Research Initiative. Whether you’re thinking about applying for an grant to work with a faculty member on a research project and possibly win additional funding to present at a national conference or you just want to learn more about research opportunities at Pace, it’s time for you to hear more about the Undergraduate Research Preparation Series!

Undergraduate research is an excellent way to prepare for graduate school, post-baccalaureate opportunities, and full-time jobs. If you are interested in working closely with a professor on high-level academic research at some point during your college career, you are encouraged to attend an Undergraduate Research Information Session on:

PLV Campus
Monday, February 11
12:20 p.m.-1:15 p.m.
Gottesman Room
Please RSVP to Allyson King at aking@pace.edu by February 8.

NYC Campus
Wednesday, February 13
12:20 p.m.-1:15 p.m.
Meeting Room A, Student Union
Please RSVP to Jenny Ko at jko2@pace.edu by February 11.

At this session, you’ll

  • Hear from a panel of student and faculty researchers about current projects
  • Learn about the impact of scholarly research on the job application and graduate admissions process
  • Discover different kinds of research opportunities at Pace and how to become a part of Pace’s research community

Additional sessions throughout the semester will be held on topics including scholarly research and design, creating ePortfolios to showcase research, and a world of opportunities.


About the series:

The Undergraduate (UGR) Research Preparation Series, developed by the Division of Student Success, offers participants the opportunity to partake in scholarly research discussions and interactive professional development activities that help develop the skills students will need to participate in an undergraduate research experience in the future. A principal goal of the UGR Research Preparation Series is to stimulate student interaction in order to nurture a sense of community that values collaborative learning and appreciates multiple perspectives. Furthermore, the Undergraduate Research Preparation Series teaches the importance and value of engaging in professional development with faculty. Professional development of working relationships helps researchers to collaborate with experts inside and outside of their major area, to think critically about the world, and to devise strategies that lead to more informed action in addressing problems. Ultimately, students who participate in the Undergraduate Research Preparation Series will gain a better understanding of themselves and other disciplines, research approaches, and peoples.

What the Nose Knows

Dyson Professor Jack Horne, PhD, and his students use a state-of-the-art confocal microscope to study how genes affect the development of the brain and olfactory system in zebrafish. >>Read More in Opportunitas

Dyson Professor Jack Horne, PhD, and his students use a state-of-the-art confocal microscope to study how genes affect the development of the brain and olfactory system in zebrafish. >>Read More

Researching for Answers

From autism to zebrafish, follow 27 Pace students who are currently working with faculty on exciting research projects.

At most schools, funded research is reserved for graduate or doctoral students. At Pace, thanks to the Undergraduate Research Initiative, 27 students are currently paired with faculty members on projects ranging from researching the brain development and sense of smell of zebrafish to the effects of video gaming on impulsive behavior in college students to combating neuromuscular disorders through the synthesis of novel therapeutic drugs.

And you don’t have to hear us go on and on about the work they’re doing. All 27 students will be blogging about their experiences. You can hear from Dyson student Dahlia Mayerson, who’s working to identify and characterize the benefits of sibling support for people on the Autism spectrum; Lubin student Adam Bednarz, who’s looking into how a class of undergraduate students at Pace has been able to outperform professionals in the market with their student-managed investment portfolios; Seidenberg student Ariana Abramson, who’s using the newly installed solar classroom located on the Pleasantville Campus to analyze energy consumption and solar energy generation; and Dyson student Henry Li, who’s working on obesity and trying to discover an alternative to BMI that has a better predictive validity for cognitive deficits. Other topics range from breast cancer research to analyzing online community for parents with LGBTQ children, and much more! Read all about it on the Pace Undergraduate Research blog.

The Undergraduate Student-Faculty Research Program, now in its second year, showcases not only the great research by Pace’s faculty, but also by our diverse undergraduate student body. End-of-year showcases in April 2013 on the NYC and PLV campuses will recognize all research initiatives through formal presentations and poster sessions and winning pairs will be selected by a panel of judges and those winners will be provided funding toward conference expenses, but more info on that in the coming months.

Researching for Answers

Interested in conducting research with a faculty member and publishing your findings and presenting at a national conference? For the second year in a row, Pace brings you the Undergraduate Research Initiative and they need your inquiring minds by May 30!

Attention undergraduate students from all majors: The Pace Undergraduate Research Initiative is back for the 2012-2013 academic year!

This means you, yes you, will have the opportunity to be paired up with a faculty member according to interests and background to work on a research project from September 2012 until March 2013. And when we say research project, this could mean anything. Last year’s 15 awardees ranged from the scientific (mercury contamination and enzymes associated with HIV) to the imaginative (pairing horror stories with web-based artwork and Star Trek with history) to sex (Literacy and the Gender Gap), drugs (TB, mycobacteria and vaccination development), and even rock and roll (Bring on the Velvet Revolution: The Politics of Individual Subjectivity in Tom Stoppard’s “Rock ‘n’ Roll”).

All research initiatives will be recognized at end-of-year showcases on both campuses and two award winners (one on each campus) will be announced and receive an award and funding to attend a regional or national conference. In addition to recognition, you’ll gain hands-on experience and a deeper appreciation of your field, work closely with world-renowned faculty, and strengthen your research, critical thinking, analytical, and writing skills.

What you need to do by May 30 is fill out the application here to get started on what could be the beginning of something huge!

Earlier this month, the 15 Undergraduate Research Initiative awardees for 2011-2012 presented their findings through poster sessions and formal presentations at showcases held on both campuses. The winning pair on the PLV Campus was Seidenberg student Mark Kowtko and Seidenberg Professor Jean F. Coppola, PhD, who presented on Open Source Assistive Technology Website and Application Development. The honorary mention went to the Dyson student Boyan Robak/Dyson Professor Paul Griffin, PhD, team, whose research was on Recovering from a Romantic Break-up: Examining the Influence of Attachment, Rejecting Sensitivity, and Gender. On the NYC Campus, the winning team was Dyson student Megan Kenny and Seidenberg student Christelle Scharff, who brought their different backgrounds together for Mobile Technology and the Environment. The honorary mention went to Dyson student Neil Patel and Dyson Professor Marcy Kelly, who presented on the Effects of Glutathione and its Derivatives on the Survival of Mycobacterium bovis-BCG Vegetative and Persistent Organisms. You can read more from the 2011-2012 awardees on the Undergraduate Research Initiative blog at http://ugresearch.blogs.pace.edu/.

For more information about the program, contact Sue Maxam, University Director for Student Success, at (914) 522-7913 or smaxam@pace.edu.

A Walk on the Wild Side

When Melissa Grigione was growing up in Scarsdale, NY, she would ride her bike to the Bronx Zoo and watch the animals. Repeat: ride her bike 20 miles to the zoo! There, Grigione discovered her true calling–protecting the environment and wildlife all over the world. Learn more about her research…

By Pace student Helen Arase ‘14

“How can we help most as scientists? Be advocates; figure out how to influence the world,” says Melissa Grigione, PhD, associate professor and director of the environmental science graduate program.

Grigione was always a lover of nature. She remembers watching movies with her parents like Born Free and The Last Giraffe, and learning about people who were interesting and saved animals. “It was a calling. It picked me. I felt it deep in my soul,” she said.

In addition to teaching courses including research methods for ecological field studies and research in environmental science on the PLV Campus, she is also heavily involved in research outside of Pace and has traveled around the world to pursue her love: protecting and conserving the environment. However, when she is in the classroom, it is all about applying what the students are learning to real-world issues. Grigione focuses on three avenues–policy, science, and  communication–and uses all of them in her research. As an ecologist, Grigione admits that she cannot battle the huge environmental issues all by herself. She needs to have many tentacles that reach out to policy makers, public health officials, and great communicators. It needs to be a team effort.

What is Griogione currently focusing on? She and her family are working as a team in the Badlands of South Dakota to study the reproductive biology of bison. This effort is aided by the indigenous people of the area.

She is also acutely interested in carnivores, specifically the “secret” carnivores that could be harmful in our ecosystem, like wild cats and coyotes. The challenge with those animals is two-fold: First, can humans learn to accept them? And second, can we create viable habitats for these species? These questions may not have an answer yet. As Grigione notes, we have to take a “lifetime approach” to conservation. For example, Grigione went to Patagonia in South America to do research on why the farmers were killing the puma there. She found that even though the puma were not killing the sheep like the farmers assumed, there was no tolerance for them. The farmers killed them regardless of whether or not they were a true threat. The amount of indifference to the natural world is alarming to Grigione. She says, “It is our duty and moral responsibility to influence change.”

When you see Melissa Grigione walking around campus, stop and think about all the fascinating work she is doing. Ask how you can help. Maybe one day, you too can be traveling around the world to help protect it!

Environmental Crusaders

There are quite a few people at Pace who are leading the fight for what they believe in. Angelo Spillo and Michelle Rodriguez are some of the crusaders for our environment. Want to know what Pace thinks of our earth and how to save it? Spillo and Rodriguez are looking for the answer. >>Read More

by Pace student Helen Arase ’14

Here’s a little tip: If you’re planning on asking Angelo Spillo, director of the Environmental Center and academic coordinator for Environmental Studies in Pleasantville, why Pace should be concerned with the environment, be prepared for a passionate response.

“Shouldn’t everyone? How can we not be concerned? Every semester I start my classes off by asking my students, ‘Who likes to have clean water to drink? Who likes breathing clean air? Who likes to eat food that grows in clean soil?’  They all raise their hands and smile as if to say ‘What dumb questions!’” he says. “But when I ask, ‘Who spends time thinking about the condition of our environment?’ only a few if any raise their hands. The point is that abuses to our environment, whether we care or not, will impact us all in some way. Maybe not today, but maybe in 10 or 20 years.  The Pace Community, I believe, has a responsibility as an institution of higher education to do everything it can to promote environmental awareness.”

In addition to coordinating Earth Month and educating students on the environment, Spillo is currently working on environmental research with Pace undergraduate student Michelle Rodriguez. Chosen as one of 15 professor/student teams for the Undergraduate Student-Faculty Research Program, Rodriguez and Spillo are trying to get at the heart of why students are indifferent to Pace’s environmental sustainability efforts.

Where do we stand on sustainability and our place in the natural world? This is the question the Spillo-Rodriguez team is asking. They hope to develop a response to encourage future participation at Pace and help connect and educate a higher percentage of students. Our earth is worth the hard work that Spillo and Rodriguez are doing, and we should support them!

For the past few months, they’ve  collected roughly 250 student surveys that will have information about students’ perceptions and priorities of Pace’s environmental  efforts. Their research will benefit the GreenPace Sustainability Committee and will suggest the next steps Pace should take to engage and better serve the students on both campuses in order to become a greener institution. If you want to see them presenting their research, stop by the Undergraduate Research End-of-Year Showcase on April 10 in PLV and make sure to check out Michelle’s blog entries for more info on their findings.

Make sure to stay tuned over the next few weeks as I interview more of Pace’s environmental crusaders!

There’s No Case Like Showcase

Esterases and heart failure; Star Trek and history; literacy and the gender gap. For the past two semesters, 15 student and faculty pairs have been working together on research as part of Pace’s Undergraduate Research Initiative. Now join us to hear about their findings at showcases on April 10 in PLV and April 11 in NYC.

Please join Interim Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, and the Division for Student Success in recognizing the achievements of the inaugural Pace Undergraduate Research Initiative student-faculty research pairs at the Undergraduate Student Faculty Research Showcases.

From the scientific—mercury contamination, enzymes associated with HIV, and tuberculosis vaccine development—to the imaginative—pairing horror stories with web-based artwork and Star Trek with history—and much more, 15 Pace student and faculty pairs will highlight their research through formal presentations and poster sessions, culminating in an award presentation.

Pleasantville Showcase:
Tuesday, April 10, 2012
2:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.
Kessel Student Center
Gottesman Room

New York City Showcase:
Wednesday, April 11, 2012
12:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.
1 Pace Plaza
Multipurpose Room

Please RSVP by Friday, March 30 to Sue Maxam at (914) 773-3849 or smaxam@pace.edu and note which showcase you plan to attend.

For more information about the pairings or to read progress on their blogs, visit www.pace.edu/ugresearch.

 

The Real World: Pace

This is the true story of 15 Setters picked for an undergraduate research project. Find out what happens when they stop being regular students and start getting real…world experiences.

At most schools, funded research is reserved for graduate or doctoral students. At Pace, thanks to the Undergraduate Research Initiative, 15 students are currently paired with faculty members on projects ranging from Horror Stories and web-based artwork to cardiovascular research to the impact of the Great Recession on the middle class and much more!

And you don’t have to hear us tell you all about the work they’re doing. All 15 students will be blogging about their experiences. You can hear from Seidenberg student Brent McDonald, who’s working with fan fiction phenom and Dyson professor Nancy Reagin on the impact of Star Trek on our society; find out what SOE student Andrew Newmark is uncovering about gender and the literacy gap with SOE professor Sister St. John Delany; get the scoop with Dyson student Meghan Kenny who is learning about mobile technology for greener cities with Seidenberg professor Christelle Scharff; and much more! Check out their blogs at http://ugresearch.blogs.pace.edu/.

Developed by Interim Provost Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, the program is intended to showcase not only the great research by our faculty, but also by our undergraduate student body and features several cross-discipline pairings that will continue through the end of the spring semester.

An end-of-year showcase in April 2012 will recognize all research initiatives through formal presentations and poster sessions and two winning pairs will be selected by a panel of judges and those winners will be provided funding toward conference expenses. More info on that and how to apply for a 2012-2013 grant in the coming months!

You can also follow their work and other initiatives brought to you by the Office for Student Success by following them on Twitter.

Researching for Answers

Interested in conducting research with a faculty member and publishing your findings and presenting at a national conference? Pace is launching an undergraduate student-faculty research pilot program during the 2011-2012 academic year and they need your inquiring minds by May 31!

Attention undergraduate students from all majors!

The Division for Student Success, in consultation with the Undergraduate Research Committee, has announced the Pace Undergraduate Research Initiative, where students and faculty will be paired up according to interests and background to work on a research project from September 2011-March 2012.

All research initiatives will be recognized at end-of-year showcases on both campuses and two award winners (one on each campus) will be announced and receive an award and funding to attend a regional or national conference. In addition to recognition, you’ll gain hands-on experience and a deeper appreciation of your field, work closely with faculty, and strengthen your research, critical thinking, analytical, and writing skills.

All you need to do by May 31 is fill out this student application to get started on what could be the beginning of something huge!

For more information, contact Sue Maxam, University Director for Student Success, at (914) 522-7913 or smaxam@pace.edu.