Lust and Found

Pace Performing Arts students say Hello Again to love affairs in their latest production on February 29-March 4.

On February 29-March 4, Pace musical theater students take on Hello Again, Michael John LaChiusa’s musical adaptation of Arthure Schnitzler’s provocative play La Ronde in the Schaeberle Studio Theater on the NYC Campus.

A chronicle of seduction and fantasy, the play follows 10 characters through 10 decades of the 20th century, all tied together through love, lust, loss, and their fears and insecurities.

Opening in the early 20th century, we meet a prostitute with a beautiful brooch who seduces a soldier. Stolen by the soldier, the brooch makes its way through journeys and scenes in this intricate musical that takes one character from each scene into the next until it completes the circle.

Performances will be held on February 29-March 2 at 8:00 p.m. and on March 3 at 2:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. and March 4 at 1:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. For ticket reservations, e-mail performingarts@pace.edu. For upcoming productions, visit the Performing Arts website.

Let’s Talk About Sex Shops and Murdertown

On March 3 and 4 enter a world of corporate greed, lost obsessions, sex shops, and more with the Actors Studio Drama School Staged Reading Series, featuring Pace student Sean Michael Welch.
Read more in our sister pub, Opportunitas

On March 3 and 4 enter a world of corporate greed, lost obsessions, sex shops, and more with the Actors Studio Drama School Staged Reading Series, featuring Pace student Sean Michael Welch.
Read more in our sister pub, Opportunitas

Cooking Up a Story

Nicholas’ life-long dream of opening a bakery has finally come true. But when an ex-employee laces the dough with rat poison, will his dreams die, along with his patrons? Studio 501 presents The Bakery, and it seems they have it in the bag…uette.

Things heat up for Pace Studio 501 on February 22-26 as they present The Bakery. Written and directed by Pace student Brandon Pfeltz and starring Pace students, The Bakery is a dark comedy about Nicholas, a middle-aged man who sells all of his possessions to follow his life-long dream of opening a bakery. He soon realizes that he has no talent for baking and the only customers are his friends who take pity on him. But when a disgruntled ex-employee laces the dough with rat poison, which makes the bread taste delicious, things begin to look up for the little bakery…sort of. As the business takes off, the customers begin to die. Nicholas is faced with a moral dilemma that we all must face sometime in our lives: Do we come clean, or do we keep our mouths shut and sell our friends and neighbors death packaged in a mouthwatering crisp French baguette?

Showtimes are at 8:00 p.m. and doors open at 7:30 p.m. on the NYC Campus. Tickets are very limited so reservations are recommended. To reserve tickets, please email pace501@hotmail.com

For more on Pace Studio 501, visit their website.

Thinking Outside the (Black) Box

On February 13, Performing Arts at Pace presents The Masters Series: Conversations with Leaders in the American Theater, featuring visionaries from three of our most influential American theater institutions–The Lincoln Center, BAM, and The Public LAB. >>Read More

On February 13, Performing Arts at Pace presents The Masters Series: Conversations with Leaders in the American Theater, featuring visionaries from three of our most influential American theater institutions–The Lincoln Center, BAM, and The Public LAB. >>Read More

Masquerades and Murder

Pierre Corneille’s 17th Century classic L’illusion Comique is brought to life by Dyson Performing Arts students on January 31-February 4.

Voodoo, mystery, lust, love, jealousy, murder, buffoonery, betrayal, reality, and illusion. Sound intriguing to you? Head on over to the Schaeberle Studio Theater on the NYC Campus to see Performing Arts students take the stage in L’illusion Comique, adapted and directed by Pace student Kevin P. Joyce.

Performances will be held on January 31-February 4 at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are $5 for students and $10 for adults, and can be reserved by emailing performingarts@pace.edu.  

In this new adaptation of Corneille’s masquerade of buffoonery, betrayal, and beauty, set in 1916 New Orleans, Pridamant, a wealthy aging lawyer, seeks the aid of Alcandre, a voodoo priestess, to find his estranged son Clindor. Alcandre conjures visions of Clindor’s adventures and foils including the love labyrinth between he, the wealthy Isabelle, her suitor Adraste, the clownish Matamore, and the sly maid Lyse. The visions become a farce of plots, passions, tears, trials, magic, and… murder. To get a sneak peek, check out this video.

A Place for Plays and Pirouettes

Dyson’s Performing Arts Department has a new home at 140 William Street, which will house classrooms, studio and practice spaces, scene and costume shops, a TV studio, multiple performance spaces, and a state-of-the-art, 100-seat theater to be used year-round, thanks to a 21-year lease signed by Pace. >>Read More


Dyson’s Performing Arts Department has a new home at 140 William Street, which will house classrooms, studio and practice spaces, scene and costume shops, a TV studio, multiple performance spaces, and a state-of-the-art, 100-seat theater to be used year-round, thanks to a 21-year lease signed by Pace. >>Read More

Enter Stage Left

On December 14-17, Performing Arts students present their original one-act plays at the annual Student Directing Festival in the Schaeberle Studio on the NYC Campus. Programs A, B, and C will be held on December 14, 15, and 16 at 8:00 p.m., and a special marathon on December 17 with all three programs beginning at 12:00 p.m. >>Read More


On December 14-17, Performing Arts students present their original one-act plays at the annual Student Directing Festival in the Schaeberle Studio on the NYC Campus. Programs A, B, and C will be held on December 14, 15, and 16 at 8:00 p.m., and a special marathon on December 17 with all three programs beginning at 12:00 p.m. >>Read More

From Fairytale to Tragedy

Painting glow-in-the-dark watch faces takes a tragic turn when people begin dying from radioactive poisoning. On December 7-11, Pace’s Performing Arts Department presents These Shining Lives, a 1920’s and 30’s story of struggle and survival.

Performing Arts students will take on Melanie Marnich’s These Shining Lives, directed by Dyson professor Ruis Woertendyke, on December 7-11 in the Schaeberle Studio Theater, 41 Park Row, 10th Floor, on the NYC Campus.

A fairytale turned tragedy, Catherine Donahue and her friends have what she calls “one-of-a-kind work in a one-of-a-kind place in a one-of-a-kind time” painting glow-in-the-dark watch faces at the Radium Dial Company in Ottawa, Illinois.

The war is over, the economy is booming, and things are looking great. Until Catherine and her friends become ill with bone infections and cancers and find out that the paint they’re using is radioactive. Though dying from the poisoning, through strength and determination the women file a class action law suit to hold companies responsible for employee safety and help save the lives of those who will come after them.

Performances will be held on Wednesday-Friday at 8:00 p.m.; Saturday at 2:00 and 8:00 p.m.; and Sunday at 2:00 p.m. For information or reservations, e-mail theater@pace.edu.

The Gambler

Adapted from Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel of the same name, The Gambler brings to life the story of Alexei Ivonovich, who gambles more than just his money at the roulette wheel. Come see Pace Studio 501’s story of idealism, greed, and unrequited love on November 30-December 4

Alexei is a tutor for the children of a General who is severely in debt. But Alexei is not only a tutor. Alexei is a gambler. Not only with money, but with every facet of his life.

Set in 1863 Roulettenburg, Germany, the tale of The Gambler follows Alexei as he tests the limits of rationality at the roulette wheel, with the established order, and with his love for the General’s daughter, Polina. A story of idealism, greed, and unrequited love, The Gambler poses the question: Is the pathology of gambling really any different than the typical ideals we follow in every day life?

Come see this Pace Studio 501 production, adapted and directed by Pace student George Robson and starring Pace students, on November 30-December 4 at 8:00 p.m. in Studio 501, Room W501, 1 Pace Plaza, NYC Campus. Reserve your free tickets here.

Kiss Me, Kate

If you liked 10 Things I Hate About You, you’re going to love the Pace Performing Arts production of Kiss Me, Kate, featuring a musical version of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew on November 16-20. >>Read More

Fighting and sending flowers to the wrong woman! Gambling and gangsters! Pace’s BFA Musical Theater program presents Cole Porter’s Broadway sensation Kiss Me, Kate, a play within a play featuring William Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, on November 16-20 in the Schimmel Theater on the NYC Campus.

Directed by Bob Cline, with musical direction by Mark Fifer and choreography by Rhonda Miller, this is a show you will not want to miss!

Performances will be held on November 16-19 at 8:00 p.m. and November 20 at 1:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.

Tickets for last week’s Elephant’s Graveyard sold out fast, so reserve your Kiss Me, Kate tickets today by e-mailing theater@pace.edu.

Unleashing the God of Carnage

Hudson Stage Company presents a comedy of manners—without the manners—at the Woodward Hall Theater on the Briarcliff Campus November 4-19.

The other day in the neighborhood park, 11-year-old Benjamin whacked his playmate Henry with a stick, breaking two teeth. Trying to set the right example, the parents of the boys sit down to discuss the matter calmly and reasonably as adults. After all, nothing will be gained by behaving like children…until they do. Turns out it’s not just the kids that will be kids.

Check out this bitingly funny show, God of Carnage, by Tony award winning playwright Yasmina Reza presented by Hudson Stage Company at the Woodward Hall Theater on the Briarcliff Campus. There will be a preview night on November 4 and the opening will be on November 5. The show has performances on weekends through November 19.

To learn more and get tickets, visit their website.

The Singing Spelunker

Dyson’s Performing Arts Department presents Floyd Collins, the story of a man trapped in a Kentucky cave. If you’re thinking 127 Hours meets the Chilean miners story with a little bluegrass/Americana thrown into the mix, then you’ve hit the nail on the head.

On October 19-23, the Performing Arts Department, under the direction of Amy Rogers and musical direction of Robert Meffe, will bring to life Floyd Collins with performances Wednesday through Friday at 8:00 p.m.; Saturday at 2:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.; and Sunday at 1:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. in the Schaeberle Studio Theater, 41 Park Row, 10th Floor, NYC Campus. For information or reservations, call (212) 346-1954 or e-mail theater@pace.edu.

The bluegrass/Americana musical tells the chilling and true story of Floyd Collins, a Kentucky cave explorer who ends up trapped under a rock in a tight passageway during the winter of 1925. Within days of attempts at freeing him, a media circus ensues and the nation watches as rescuers try everything: digging a new passageway, finding a doctor to amputate his stuck foot, feeding him. After four days, a collapse in the cave cuts off all but voice contact with Collins. When rescuers were finally able to sink a shaft to rescue him 17 days after he became trapped, what they find is disheartening.

The Treatment

Pace students take on Eve Ensler’s The Treatment, a play about the many harsh implications that soldiers face to honor their country, on October 5-9 on the NYC Campus.

On October 5-9, Pace Studio 501 kicks off their fall 2011 season with The Treatment, Eve Ensler’s attack on the trials and tribulations of the “new” rules of the Iraq war, and the many harsh implications that soldiers face to honor their country.

Directed by Pace student Dondre Stuetley and starring Lauren Elizabeth Morra and Patrick Pribyl, performances will be held at 8:00 p.m., Wednesday through Sunday, in Room W501 of One Pace Plaza.

The play centers around two people involved in a web of twisted values, hidden fears, and a power struggle between what is right and what is wrong. After returning back from the war, Rank is assigned periodic treatment with a psychiatrist, Sergeant. It is in these periodic “treatments” that his belief in war is tested, as he uncovers the dark past that continues to haunt him. This play examines the harsh accounts perpetrated during war, and questions who’s to blame for the repercussions soldiers face when being forced to commit horrible acts of slaughter.

To reserve your free tickets, click here.

Studio 501, the student-run theatre at Pace, exploded onto the Pace theatre scene in October of 2008 with Neil LeBute’s Bash, and has become a praised staple of University theatre life since. Students direct, act, design, manage, and produce published and student-written plays and musicals, creating a unique, hands-on experience.

A Tree Grows in Schaeberle

An inspiring story told through the eyes of a white six-year-old child in South Africa during the times of Apartheid, Dyson Performing Arts students present The Syringa Tree on September 28-October 2 on the NYC Campus.

Performing Arts students take on award-winning playwright Pamela Gien’s The Syringa Tree, seen in its original form by Oprah, J.D. Salinger, and Paul Newman, in their first production of the academic year. Performances will be held September 28-October 2, Wednesday-Friday at 8:00 p.m.; Saturday at 2:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m., and Sunday at 1:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. at the Schaeberle Studio Theater on the 10th floor of 41 Park Row on the NYC Campus. For reservations or more information, call (212) 346-1954 or email theater@pace.edu.

The Syringa Tree is a haunting story of a white six-year-old child named Lizzy, whose closest friend and nanny Salamina’s baby is born in their shared home as she helps hide in the early 1960’s South Africa. Seen first through the eyes of inquisitive six-year-old Lizzy as she tries to understand the racism and violence, the story spans four generations, from early apartheid to the present day.

Next up will be Eve Ensler’s The Treatment, a story about a mentally disturbed soldier who just returned from Iraq, on October 5-9. But more on that next week!

Pace Takes on Tennessee Williams

On April 27-May 1, Pace’s performing arts students bring to life Tennessee Williams’ The Notebook of Trigorin on the NYC Campus.

The Performing Arts department will close off a wildly successful season of productions with The Notebook of Trigorin on April 27-May 1.

One of Tennessee Williams latest and lesser known plays, The Notebook of Trigorin was Williams’ free adaptation of Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull.

The show runs from Wednesday, April 27, through Sunday, May 1, with 8:00 p.m. showings on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, 11:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. on Saturday, and 1:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. on Sunday at the Schaeberle Studio in 41 Park Row. Tickets are $5  for students and seniors and $10 for everyone else. For reservations, email theater@pace.edu and include your name, number of tickets, and performance date and time.

A Plethora of Plays

From students taking on The Tempest and Thornton Wilder’s Our Town, to Hudson Stage Company’s hilarious Boston Marriage to The Acting Company’s Comedy of Errors, everywhere you turn it’s all work and more play.

Guys and Gals Gone Wilder
Through April 17 Pace’s Studio 501 presents  Thornton Wilder’s Our Town, a three-act play about an average town’s citizens in the early 20th century.  Tickets are free with a suggested donation. For reservations, email pace501@hotmail.com (make sure to include your full name, phone number, and the number of tickets you would like). For more about Studio 501 at Pace, click here.

O Brave New World
One of William Shakespeare’s last works, The Tempest, a play about a wizard named Prospero who decides to leave his remote island paradise and give up his magical powers to become Duke of Milan, comes alive in the Student Union on April 20-22 as put on by Stand Up Productions, a not-for-profit theater company run entirely by students. All proceeds from the event will benefit UNICEF so make sure to come by! Stand Up is currently accepting proposals for the fall 2011 season. Submit your proposals to StandUpProduction@gmail.com no later than May 1. For more information on Stand Up, visit their website at standupproductions.weebly.com.

Not Your Ordinary Desperate Housewives!
Hudson Stage Company presents Boston Marriage, a comedy by Pulitzer Prize winner David Mamet. Anna and Claire are two bantering, scheming women of fashion who have long lived together on the fringes of upper-class society. As the two women trade barbs and take turns taunting Anna’s hapless Scottish parlor maid, Claire’s young inamorata suddenly appears, setting off a crisis that puts the women’s futures at risk. See what The New York Times calls “devastatingly funny…exceptionally clever” and what the New York Post calls “Brilliant…One of Mamet’s most satisfying and accomplished plays and one of the funniest American comedies in years.The show runs April 29-May 14 at the Woodward Hall Theater on the Briarcliff Campus. Tickets are $35 but Pace students can go for $20. If you’re interested in being an usher, admission will be free. Call (914) 271-2811 for details about ushering.

Shake It Up
Pace’s successful Shakespeare season comes to an end next week as Charlie Chaplin meets William Shakespeare in a riotous collaboration as the Acting Company presents The Comedy of Errors through April 17 at the Schimmel Theater. $5 advance and rush tickets for Pace students!

Discover the Next Bradley Cooper
The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace presents its annual Repertory Season, five weeks of theatre designed to introduce our graduating students to the professional world and the public in fully-professional productions of the work they have created during their three years of study. Witness a weekly series of scenes, one-act plays, and full-length plays, some written by our playwrights, and all of them directed by our directors and acted by our actors from April 13 through May 14 at the theater at Dance New Amsterdam at 53 Chambers Street in NYC and is open to the public. Admission is free, but reservations are  recommended as seating is limited. For reservations to see the rising stars of Broadway and Hollywood, call (212) 613-6209 or email ASDSRep@pace.edu.

And that’s not all. Stay tuned in the coming weeks for information about the Performing Arts production of Tennessee Williams’ The Notebook of Trigorin on April 27-May 1, and the annual Dance Out Loud on April 29-30.

Rock-Opera Pinball

Murder, pain, rock and roll, and pinball superstardom: It’s what great musicals are made of. On March 30-April 3, performing arts students take on The Who’s Tommy at Pace.

The Who frontman Peter Townshend’s tale of a young boy’s journey from pain to triumph is an electrifying story you’re not going to want to miss on the NYC Campus! Based on The Who’s 1969 rock opera Tommy, The Who’s Tommy is a Tony Award-winning show that brought Broadway to rock and roll and now Pace’s Performing Arts department is ready to bring it to you!

After seeing his father accidentally kill his mother’s lover, Tommy is traumatized into catatonia, and as the boy grows, he suffers abuse at the hands of  relatives and neighbors. As an adolescent, he’s discovered to have an uncanny knack for playing pinball, and when his mother finally breaks through his catatonia, he becomes an international pinball superstar. This jukebox musical will feature some of The Who’s greatest hits including “Pinball Wizard,” “See Me, Feel Me,” and “We’re Not Gonna Take It.”

Performances will be held at the Schimmel Theater on March 30-April 3, Wednesday-Saturday at 8:00 p.m.; Saturday at 2:00 p.m. Sunday at 1:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. To reserve your tickets, call: (212) 346-1954 or email theater@pace.edu.

Present your Pace ID at the Schimmel Box office on April 1 for a complimentary ticket to the 2pm matinee performance.

A Tough Act to Follow

You don’t need to depend on the kindness of strangers for the opportunity to see these rarely produced one-act plays by Tennessee Williams.

You’re probably familiar with The Glass Menagerie, and maybe you’ve even cried out “Stella!” but chances are, you’ve never seen Tennessee Williams quite like this. La MaMa Experimental Theater Club and the Department of Performing Arts have come together to present us with three rarely-seen Tennessee Williams productions. The festival, running March 4 through March 6 at La MaMa in NYC features three one-act plays with characters including a New Orleans transvestite, a paralyzed man, and lovers on the brink.

And Tell Sad Stories of the Death of Queens is the funny and touching story of a New Orleans transvestite trying to make a life for herself with a brutish and exploitative sailor while suffering from “the specter of loneliness.”  In The Remarkable Rooming House of Madame Le Monde, a mysteriously paralyzed man moves around his attic by swinging from hooks as he prepares for the arrival of his old friend. And in The Pink Bedroom features a man and his mistress in the setting where they’ve conducted their 10-year affair as each blames the other for the disintegration of their relationship.

Click here for ticketing information and performance schedule.

Turning Opera Upside Down

Thieves, informers, prostitutes, and highwaymen. Performing Arts students expose the dark side of society in The Beggar’s Opera through February 20.

On February 16-20, the Performing Arts department hits the stage with John Gay’s 18th century musical, The Beggar’s Opera. A tale about Captain Macheath, a shameless highway robber with “wives” all over town, who messes with the wrong girls and is ultimately jailed and sentenced to death. While waiting to be hanged, he’s entertained by a musical beggar, who has written an opera of which the captain is the hero.

Performances will be held at the Schaeberle Studio Theater at 41 Park Row, Wednesday through Saturday at 8:00 p.m., Saturday at 2:00  p.m., and Sunday at 1:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. For more information or ticket reservations, email theater@pace.edu or call (212) 346-1954.

Next up in March, students take on The Who’s 1969 double album rock opera Tommy in the appropriately titled The Who’s Tommy.

From the Farm to the Factory

On January 26-30, Pace New Musicals takes you on a unique journey from farm to factory, country to city, wood to steel, via new american classic rock musical Factory Girls.

The Pace New Musicals program presents Factory Girls on January 26-30 at the Schaeberle Studio (10th floor of 41 Park Row) on the NYC Campus.

Performances are Wednesday-Saturday at 8:00 p.m., with matinees at 2 p.m. on Saturday and 3 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets are $12 for adults and $8 for students and can be reserved by emailing pacenewmusicals@gmail.com.

With a dynamic score that fuses hard rock, country, funk, and heavy metal, Factory Girls tells the story of 1840s Yankee farm girls and BFFs Harriet Farley and Sarah Bagley who go to Lowell, Massachusetts, “the City of Spindles,” in order make a better life. After laboring for up to 14 hours a day, the girls write and publish their own company-sponsored publication, The Lowell Offering, which becomes a worldwide literary phenomenon. When working conditions deteriorate due to competition and economic hardship, Sarah speaks out against the corporation but Harriet refuses to sacrifice the gains the women have made. The resulting battle rips their friendship apart and alters the course of the American worker.

Factory Girls features music and lyrics by Creighton Irons and Sean Mahoney and a book by Maggie-Kate Coleman. The cast is comprised of Pace musical theater students and the show is directed by Amy Rogers, the head of Pace’s BFA Musical Theater Program, with musical direction by Rob Meffe.

To learn more about Factory Girls, visit www.factorygirlsmusical.com.

Bah! Humbug!

It’s beginning to look a lot like A Christmas Carol. We’ve been anxiously awaiting a visit from the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come and the time is almost here. On December 8-12, Scrooge arrives at Pace…and we’re not talking about finals.

Celebrate the season with Tiny Tim, Bob Cratchit, Jacob Marley, and our favorite old miser Ebenezer Scrooge as the Pace Performing Arts Department presents Charles Dickens’ classic A Christmas Carol on December 8-12 at the Schimmel Center in NYC.

Adapted and directed by acting professor Grant Kretchik, choreographed by dance professor Rhonda Miller, and starring more than 40 Pace students, this timeless show is sure to get you in the holiday spirit.

Tickets are $8 for students and seniors and $12 for adults, and can be reserved by emailing theater@pace.edu.

For a little sneak peek, check out videos of the cast’s performances at the South Street Seaport tree lighting on November 26.

No ‘Humbug’ this season: Just like Scrooge decided to give money to the less fortunate after his eye-opening journey, Kretchik and the cast of A Christmas Carol will be fundraising after each of their eight shows for Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. Read more on BroadwayWorld.com.

Sad Songs Say So Much

A musical about love, life, and loss, Elegies: A Song Cycle tells the story of the people William Finn has lost throughout his life. On November 17–21, the Pace Performing Arts department shows you that “the ending is not the story.”

Written by William Finn in the wake of 9/11, Elegies: A Song Cycle honors the life and memory of those we lost, and pays tribute to friends, family, and even pets that Finn lost throughout the years.  

A collection of songs celebrating the lives of these loved ones and not their final moments, Elegies will take you on a musical journey that’ll make you laugh, think, smile, and cry as you explore and examine your own world and relationships.

RSVP to see the Performing Arts production of this show directed by Amy Rogers on November 17-21 at the Schaeberle Studio Theater on the NYC Campus. Call (212) 346-1954 or email theater@pace.edu for tickets.

More interested in the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come? Remember to reserve your tickets to see the Performing Arts production of A Christmas Carol on December 8 through 12.

Shakespeare in the Schimmel

“Why then the world’s mine oyster…” Pistol says to Falstaff in the second act of The Merry Wives of Windsor. Open it on October 28 – November 7 as Pace continues its Shakespeare season with the Shakespeare Globe’s heralded production. >>Read More

Romeo has come and gone, and now it’s time for some Falstaff fun! On October 28 Shakespeare’s Globe returns to Pace as the centerpiece of our exciting Shakespeare festival with its new London production of The Merry Wives of Windsor. The production will run through November 7 at the Schimmel Theater in NYC, and will also feature a centerpiece lecture by Pace Distinguished Professor of English and Women’s and Gender Studies Martha Driver, PhD, who will discuss some of the historical figures who may have helped shape Shakespeare’s famous Falstaff.

In the play, Falstaff arrives in Windsor with no dinero. To help his “situation,” he decides to court two wealthy married women, Mistress Ford and Mistress Page, sending them identical love letters (never a good idea.) Wise to his tricks and for the sake of their own amusement and to gain revenge, the “merry wives” pretend to respond to his advances. What comes next is…something.

Save big on tickets! Faculty and Staff code is PaceOrch for $35 for Orchestra seats and Pace2B for $25 Balcony seats!

Bless Me Father, For I Have Sinned….

Jack took to heart his second grade nun’s teaching that no matter how evil a life he led, he could still go to heaven provided he made a perfect deathbed confession. Will Father Gallagher be able to offer heavenly salvation as he encounters the most bizarre confession of his career?

A new season of Hudson Stage Company productions is upon us! On October 29, the world premiere of James McLindon’s new comedy Salvation makes its way to the Woodward Hall Theatre on the Briarcliff Campus.

Salvation is a black comedy about Jack, a dying criminal convinced he will go to heaven as long as he makes the perfect deathbed confession.  Attended by his only son and grappling with their complicated relationship, enter Father Gallagher to hear a confession he (and you!) won’t see coming.

The show runs on weekends through November 13, with a Q&A on November 7. For showtimes and ticket information, click here.